Remington College in Shreveport celebrates 10th anniversary

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For 10 years, Remington College Shreveport Campus has been preparing students for entry-level jobs in specific industries. The instructors on this campus are not just teachers in the classroom; each of them has offer real world experience working in the respective fields they teach.
Several of the instructors at the Remington College Shreveport Campus have been a staple since the college first opened its doors ten years ago. Just like the students they mentor, these instructors come from all walks of life. They are all united toward a common goal – helping students reach their key objective, graduation. For some students, helping them along that path is easy. But at other times, instructors may be providing the only encouraging words a student hears.
“You as an instructor are instrumental. I want them to do their best,” says Mark Rogers, head of the Criminal Justice department at Remington College Shreveport campus. “I tell my students, be flexible. Life is going to take you places you weren’t expecting.”
“I had a great mentor in my dad,” says Cynthia Robertson, Director of Education. “I credit him for my knowledge. I’m now passing that on to others.”
Robert Lewis, Business instructor, adamantly believes education does not stop at graduation. He continues to read and takes classes to make sure he is constantly learning and growing in his profession. “I’m reminded to keep learning and growing so I can meet the needs of my students,” says Lewis.
“I attend every orientation,” says Grace Winter, executive assistant to Shreveport campus president, Jerry Driskill. “I see some students who are ready to tackle the world, others who are nervous, and those who look scared. I try to reassure those students they’re taking a positive step to make their life better.”
The campus is a huge part of the community. Cynthia Robertson was part of the group who, five years ago, brainstormed ways to draw attention to the campus location.
“We thought, let’s have a giant yard sale,” recalls Robertson. “We let people set-up in the parking lot at no charge. Our first run had a small turn-out, but just a few months later we were fielding calls from people asking if we were doing it again. Now it’s twice a year, the parking lot is full and so is the side street.”
“I’ve walked into the bathroom and interrupted someone crying,” says Grace Winter. “I have heard various reasons for the tears, but each time I stop, listen and offer encouraging words. We try to be a family to help each other.”
Robert Lewis explains the Business Administration program strives to understand the local economy; its goal is making sure the College is offering the type of curriculum the local market needs. “Our [business administration] students are junior members of the Southern Hills Business Association. They attend monthly meetings and different functions to learn how to network, which is critical in business. Students learn getting out in front of different people can land new opportunities.”
“We know who each student is,” says Mark Rogers. “Seeing a student succeed, especially when they didn’t think it was possible, is one of the greatest feelings in the world.”
Before deciding to teach crime scene investigation, Rogers lived it for 27 years while working at the Shreveport Police Department. “When I discuss forensics with the students, I’m using my experience from the field.”
Cynthia Robertson is helping one of her students turn a dream into reality by helping her organize the necessary paperwork to open a business. “[My student] said she would have never been able to get the paperwork completed if I had not encouraged her.”
Grace Winter applauds all the activities on campus. “There is always something going on. The campus is always doing something.”
One of those many events on campus is National Night Out. This year the event, which unites the community and law enforcement in a stand against crime, will also celebrate the campus’s 10th anniversary. National Night Out will be Tuesday, October 3.
“This event stretches beyond the campus community,” says Grace Winter. “It allows us to reach into the neighborhoods.”